Fake News Alerts: Teaching News Literacy Skills in a Meme World

Taylor, Diana

ID – Media Literacy

Ireland, S. (2018). Fake news alerts: Teaching news literacy skills in a meme world. The Reference Librarian, 59(3), 122-128.

Summary: In this article, Ireland addresses the need for students to have the skills to be able to decipher whether information is true or not. In today’s fast paced world of technology, most information is sent in less than 100 words, and readers view it as true. Ireland suggests that librarians can make their own memes and infographics to provide visual information to combat it. This article covers memes, what is fake news, identifying fake news, identifying reliable news sources, accessing sources, addressing bias and logical fallacies, and how to stop being part of the problem.

Evaluation: This was an excellent article on how librarians can help address the issue of fake news with students. Ireland provides us with all the necessarily terminology to discuss fake news and provides resources to post in the library for students to view.

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Digitally Inspired Thinking: Can social media lead to deep learning in higher education?

Macchio, Erica

ET

Samuels-Peretz, D., Dvorkin Camiel, L., Teeley, K., and Banerjee, G. (2017). Digitally inspired thinking: can social media lead to deep learning in higher education? College Teaching, 65:1, 32-39. https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/doi/pdf/10.1080/87567555.2016.1225663?needAccess=true

Social media allows us to learn about many topics.  While perusing all these different topics on the many social media forums we get the yearning to learn more about items of interest.  Social media can lead to higher learning because it forces us to explore more about the little tidbits of information we come across.

Evaluation: I found this article useful because it made me think about how social media has become a big part of the way we learn.