Pedagogy of the Makerspace

  1. Quinn, Bonnie
  2. ID
  3. Fleming, L. (2018, May 1,). Pedagogy, Not Passing Trend. School Library Journal, 64, 33.
  • This article discusses the importance of makerspaces being an educational philosophy, not a fad and stresses that they are for open ended exploration for everyone.  To keep makerspaces relevant, they need to be sustainable and require reflection.  The differences between STEM labs and makerspaces are noted. The connection between makerspaces and literature is featured.

Laura Fleming does a great job explaining what makerspaces really can be and convincingly asserts that they are more than a passing trend.  She adequately explains how to keep makerspaces relevant by encouraging readers to constantly refine and grow their programming.  I agree with her assertion that a true makerspace is more than students making 30 of the same project, and that it is possible and even advantageous to bring literature into the makerspace.  Laura Fleming is a great advocate for the makerspace.

Teaching and Learning: Lost in a Buzzword Wasteland

Murphy, James

ET

Chew, S. L., & Cerbin, W. J. (2017, December 5). Teaching and learning: Lost in a buzzword wasteland. Retrieved May 12, 2018, from https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2017/12/05/need-theory-learning-opinion

This article takes a critical look at trends in education and relates that innovation successes are largely attributable to teacher excitement. After the teacher is no longer excited, the innovation may turn out to be no better than the previous trend. Despite increased research in pedagogy, concrete, evidence-based improvement in results remains elusive. The authors attribute this to a “Lack of a comprehensive, empirically validated model of how students learn.” The authors then propose how educators could start down the path to developing this model. They also claim that students have individual differences that call for tailored teaching and learning, rather than a one size fits all approach. They also list many cognitive factors that should be addressed in teaching and learning theory. They conclude the article by positing that there is not one best teaching method, but that there are best teaching methods appropriate to different situations.

I thought this was a very interesting article as it proposes major theoretical changes, supported by evidence-based practices, in the field of pedagogy. It is an ambitious proposal, but one that has merit. I think anyone who has explained the same concept very differently to two different students can appreciate what the authors are trying to articulate. The challenge, of course, is that a classroom teacher cannot always do this for 20+ students.