Why School Librarians are the Literacy Leaders We Need

Van Duzee, Alyssa

(CO) Collaboration

Sacks, A. (2018, May 30). Why school librarians are the literacy leaders we need. Retrieved from http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/whole_story/2018/05/why_school_librarians_are_lite.html

This article essentially summarizes some of the key components regarding what a librarian does. Since many libraries are underutilized (for a multitude of reasons), the article provides good insight as to what a high functioning library can offer. It also touches on the importance of the librarian truly being a literacy leader on campus.

This article is important because it showcases the impact that the librarian can have on a campus. Teachers are amazing and definitely influence their students within their classrooms. but having another person to support literacy campus-wide is only going to help support them. The article concludes with a call to action to support more well-trained certificated librarians being hired on school campuses. Funding is always an issue, but librarians can offer a lot of support and really become a leader on campus.

 

Advertisements

Inna Levine

Creating our future: Students speak up about their vision for 21st century learning. speak up 2009 national findings: K-12 students & parents. (2010). ().Project Tomorrow. 15707 Rockfield Boulevard Suite 250, Irvine, CA 92618. Retrieved from http://dialog.proquest.com/professional/docview/1238189801?accountid=143640


IL

For the past 7 years, the Speak Up National Research Project has provided the nation with a unique window into classrooms and homes all across America and given us a realistic view on how technology is currently being used (or not) to drive student achievement, teacher effectiveness and overall educational productivity. Most notably, the Speak Up data first documented and continues to reveal each year the increasingly significant digital disconnect between the values and aspirations of the nation’s students about how the use of technology can improve the learning process and student outcomes, and the values and aspirations of their less technology-comfortable teachers and administrators. Students, regardless of community demographics, socio-economic backgrounds, gender and grade, tell year after year that the lack of sophisticated use of emerging technology tools in school is, in fact, holding back their education and in many ways, disengaging them from learning.  The Speak Up 2009 national findings paints a vivid picture of this continuing digital disconnect and also, advances the premise introduced with the data the previous year that by listening to and leveraging the ideas of students we can start to build a new vision for 21st century education that is more reflective of the needs and desires of today’s learners. With the 2009 year’s findings, the researchers give voice to a new genuine “student vision” for learning and in particular, the student’s experience-based blueprint for the role of incorporating emerging technologies in 21st century education, both in and out of the classroom.
Inna Levine


CO-Collaboration Strategies


Subramaniam, M., Ahn, J., Waugh, A., Taylor, N. G., Druin, A., Fleischmann, K. R., & Walsh, G. (2013). Crosswalk between the “framework for K-12 science education” and “standards for the 21st-century learner”: School librarians as the crucial link.School Library Research, 16 Retrieved from http://dialog.proquest.com/professional/docview/1509082301?accountid=143640

Within the school library community, there have been persuasive calls for school librarians to contribute to science learning. The article presents a conceptual framework that links national standards of science education (“Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas,”) to core elements embedded in “AASL’s Standards for the 21st-Century Learner”, the standards that guide the teaching and learning of multiple literacies for which librarians are responsible in schools. Based on this conceptual framework, the authors of the article highlight how four middle school librarians in a large school district in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States enact and expand their five roles–information specialist, instructional partner, teacher, program administrator, and leader–while they participate in Sci-Dentity, a science-infused after-school program. They observed clear links between skills, dispositions, and responsibilities from the “Standards.” taught and facilitated by these school librarians, to principles in the Framework. The authors contend that the learning of the Standards is crucial to creating and sustaining science-learning environments as envisioned in the “Framework” and argue that school librarians’ role in science learning is more vital than it has ever been.

IL-Plagiarism

St Clair, Deb
IL
Strittmatter, C., & Bratton, V. (2014). Plagiarism awareness among students:
    Assessing integration of ethics theory into library instruction. College
    and Research Libraries, 75(5), 736-752. http://dx.doi.org/10.5860/
    Crl.75.5.736

Summary:  This article evaluates the views students have of plagiarism and the role of the library in increasing knowledge of plagiarism.  

This article goes in depth about the effectiveness of instruction regarding plagiarism.  The premise is if students are intentionally provided with direction instruction regarding plagiarism and the ethics regarding plagiarism, then there will be a higher perception regarding plagiarism ethics.

A great resource for school (and all) librarians

We Need Diverse Books is an organization that is dedicated to supporting diverse authors and promoting diverse books. The group started with a hashtag and has grown by leaps and bounds to become a force in the publishing and children’s books world. The website includes TONS of resources and links to websites by and about diverse authors, their books, and the world of diversity in schools and school libraries.

http://weneeddiversebooks.org

Check out the blog, and follow them on Instagram, too.

Finding Your Purpose!

This article is geared towards public libraries, but its principals can be applied to school libraries as well. Find your purpose (different than a mission statement) and use it to make your library incredibly relevant to your community in this time of Amazon, Google, and Netflix.

Huber, J & Potter, S. (2016). The purpose-based library: finding your path to survival, success, and growth. Retrieved from: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/2016/07/20/purpose-based-library/