Inquiry Based Teaching

Joffe, Stephany

ID

Inquiry Based Teaching: The Inquiry Approach. (2019). The Teaching Channel, Retrieved from: https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/reasons-for-inquiry-based-teaching

Summary: This 3 minute video from The Teaching Channel covers teacher collaboration, student inquiry, and student’s voice. A group of high school teachers discuss the inquiry model and diversity of students. Then, the video illustrated student inquiry, collaboration and student’s voice where the students are discussing Lincoln.

Evaluation: This is an excellent video example of what can be accomplished with teacher collaboration, student collaboration and the inquiry model.

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For your consideration: An Outlier

Solomon, Samantha

Ullman, R. (2018). No, Teachers Shouldn’t Put Students in the Driver’s Seat. Teacher Teacher. Retrieved 26 September 2018, from https://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2018/09/05/no-teachers-shouldnt-put-students-in-the.html

Summary: This opinion piece is written by Richard Ullman, a 29 year veteran of teaching in public high schools. In the piece Ullman defends the practice of teachings using direct instruction to communicate complex skills and concepts to students. He feels that the pendulum has swung too far towards a pedagogy based on “equat[ing] cosmetic engagement with actual learning.” He argues that educational trends are dictated and propelled by people who are removed from actual classrooms, and that as a result, the current trends around game-based learning and student driven learning actually don’t improve student outcomes. He points out that “even though the classroom looks dynamic, students appear to be busy, and the right boxes get checked during classroom observations, achievement gaps don’t close.” Ullman argues that traditional, teacher-centered instruction does work, but that confirmation bias causes experts to ignore the merits of this style in favor of chasing educational fads.

Evaluation: It’s not that I agree with Ullman’s strong preference for teacher-centered instruction, but I do think it is important to acknowledge what people who might be out of this moment’s mainstream might be thinking. I absolutely feel that there is a place for more traditional, direct instruction in classrooms and school libraries, but I also think that it has to be blended with more engaging, student-centered techniques to fully resonate and connect with students and truly enhance their learning.

10-Minute Teacher Podcast: 5 Ideas to Experience Inquiry in Your Classroom

Isbister, Kathy

Inquiry

Davis, V. (Producer & Host). (2018, September 14). 10-Minute Teacher http://podcast (Episode 360: 5 ideas to experience inquiry in your classroom). Retrieved from http://www.coolcatteacher.com/e360/

Summary: I recently found this podcast from a list of recommendations from the Edutopia blog, and I have become an active listener. In this episode, host Vicki Davis interviews Kimberly Mitchell, author of the book Experience inquiry: 5 powerful strategies, 50 practical experiences. Tips involved sharing curiosity with students by telling them what you are interested in learning more about, and encouraging students to develop open rather than closed questions (where open questions invite more thoughtful responses). One of the questions Mitchell has found especially useful is, “How do you know that?” This encourages students to share their sources and examine how they come to conclusions. It is important to note that the host discloses this was a sponsored episode and she did receive some form of compensation, but I have found her work to be credible and I felt the ideas discussed were aimed at supporting teachers rather than selling books.

Evaluation: I found this to be an engaging discussion with practical suggestions that will be easy to implement. Both host and guest are interested in supporting student learning by helping students remain curious. Curious learners have more questions, which I have found to be the basis of inquiry. The quality of questions a learner has reflects their interest in a subject, and the search for thoughtful answers encourages them to continue on their personal quests for knowledge.

 

What the Heck is Inquiry-Based Learning?

Van Duzee, Alyssa

ID (Inquiry and Design)

Wolpert-Gawron, H. (2016, August 11). What the heck Is inquiry-based learning? Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/what-heck-inquiry-based-learning-heather-wolpert-gawron

Inquiry-based learning is something that can be difficult for teachers to do because it involves giving up power and control and allowing students to take the reigns. This articles breaks down the steps necessary to bring this type of design and learning into a classroom and library. It is a very basic overview, but it gives a good sense of what inquiry-based learning entails.

This would be a great article to have staff read at the beginning of the school year because it makes something that can become very difficult seem relatively easy. It breaks down the process into 4 manageable steps. If teachers were to get on board with this, it would make an easy transition into co-teaching and ultimately deeper and wider student learning.

Design Thinking Visual

Kinsella, Jason

ID (Inquiry and Design)

An introduction to design thinking. (2018). AARK Group. Retrieved from https://www.arrkgroup.com/thought-leadership/an-introduction-to-design-thinking/

This is the best visual I have found related to design thinking. This comes from AARK Group, which a consulting firm, not an educational organization. As teachers, we know the power of visuals, but visuals related to lesson design can often be confusing, especially for students. I think this visual perfectly explains the design thinking process, and teachers may want to use this as a guide when creating a visual to post in their classroom. What makes this visual so effective, in my opinion, is the full circle of arrows, then a smaller, second circle of arrows representing the “Evaluate” stage. This visually explains the iterative nature of design thinking clearly and simply. I have seen some confusing visuals for design thinking out there, but this one represents the idea perfectly.

Design-Thinking-01

Inquiry-Based Learning – Curriculum Connections in the Library

Clem, Katy

ID

Stripling, B. K. (2003). Inquiry-Based Learning. Curriculum Connections in the Library. Edited by Stripling, B. K. & Hughes-Hassell, S. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

Barbara Stripling (of Stripling’s Model of Inquiry fame) authored the first chapter in this book written to connect librarians and educators as collaborators in education. She is a foundational thinker in inquiry-based education, and her words on the approach are a fantastic starting point for anyone approaching the subject.

This chapter is the BEST thing I read in my research for INFO 250: content-rich, based in a history of education theory, deeply inspiring, and full of practical applications that feel manageable. Tracking it down is a bit tricky; I found a used copy of the book on Amazon for $4, and every chapter is gold. SO WORTH IT.

Adriana Lugo

CO

Stripling, B. (2008) Inquiry-based teaching and learning—The role of the Library Media Specialist. School Library Media Activities Monthly XXV (1). Retrieved from 6/14/2017 /http://www.teachingbooks.net/content/InquiringMindsWantToKnow-Stripling.pdf

Explains inquiry based learning as well as how librarians can collaborate with teachers as well as use it to define their collection and teaching. It is a very informative article.