InFlow (Information Flow): An integrated model of applied information literacy

Andrea Phillips

IL

Summary:
The text describes an information literacy model called InFlow (information flow) that can be designed to engage students and support student-centered learning. The article compares InFlow to other models of information literacy. The eight elements of InFlow are presented as elements that can be taken in any order, allowing students to return to elements several times throughout the process. These elements are: Ask, Collaborate, Explore, Imagine, Make, Map, Reflect, and Show. Ways in which the model can be used to design and create are explored.

Evaluation:
The key factor of InFlow, which I think make it a useful tool for teachers, is that the core elements can be undertaken in any order at any stage of the process. The main idea embedded in this model is that students create prototypes, ask for feedback, and then revisit their design. This model seems especially useful for students who are building or creating something. That author also gives an example project plan so readers can visualize how the elements of InFlow work together.


Modeling information literacy for classrooms of the future

DiZazzo, Cynthia

IL
McNicol, S. (2014). Modeling information literacy for classrooms of the future. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 47, 303-313. doi: 10.1177/0961000614526612
Summary:
McNicol (2015) discusses the importance of students as creators of knowledge, a key standard for modern literacy which has often been overlooked in information literacy (IL) models. McNicol maintains that in many IL models, “the focus is on the learner as a consumer, evaluator and organiser of information which has previously been produced, rather than as a creator and originator of knowledge” (2015, p. 305). In her research, she determined that students were motivated through their participation in the design phase of an activity, creativity was enhanced and links to real world skills were reinforced.
Evaluation:
This article is helpful in directing teacher librarians and classroom teachers to capitalize upon students’ strengths, interests and ingenuity when designing collaborative projects to address modern literacy skills. In addition to promoting collaboration among students and teachers, McNicol’s findings encourage educators to allow and value flexibility in content, structure, and sequence when using information literacy models with students. The information presented also inspires teachers and teacher librarians to acknowledge students as content creators, rather than just consumers of information.