Creativity & Critical Thinking

Oakes, Constance

Topic: Inquiry and Design (ID)

Bibliographic Citation:  Richardson, J. (2014, October 17). How to think, not what to think [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dluwVks444

Summary:  This is a TEDxBrisbane talk with Jesse Richardson, the founder of schoolofthought.org.  In his talk, he discusses the need to stop teaching students information and to start teaching them how to think.  His thinking is that we need to teach children how to think creatively. By doing so we will be teaching students not only how to think, but how to be adaptive and how to innovate in order to solve problems.  Along with this, we need to teach critical thinking skills to teach students to be able to change their thinking and be able to be wrong which then leads to growth.

Evaluation/Opinion:  I found this TEDx to be engaging and I liked his view that thinking creatively and critical thinking skills are two sides of the same coin.  The School of Innovation is intriguing as is yourlogicalfallacyis.com and yourbias.is. I agree that this is what we need to be teaching our youth so they will be ready for the world we are leaving them.

Topic: Fake News and Media Literacy Program

posted by: Maday, Connie – ID

Perez, Sarah. Google’s new media literacy program teaches kids how to spot disinformation and fake news.  Tech Crunch. https://techcrunch.com/2019/06/24/googles-new-media-literacy-program-teaches-kids-how-to-spot-disinformation-and-fake-news/

Summary:

This article discusses a recent announcement from Google that it is expanding the digital safety curriculum to include media literacy.  The new “Internet Code of Awesome” covers key elements to internet safety and media literacy that is necessary in today’s world.  It includes teaching students to share mindfully, not fall for fake news, making sure to be safe with internet use, using kindness when on the internet, and always making sure to talk to an adult if there are questions or think that they are uncomfortable about. 

The listed key points in the article include:

Five fundamental topics of digital citizenship and safety form the Internet Code of Awesome:

• Share with Care (Be Internet Smart)

• Don’t Fall for Fake (Be Internet Alert)

• Secure Your Secrets (Be Internet Strong)

• It’s Cool to Be Kind (Be Internet Kind)

• When in Doubt, Talk It Out (Be Internet Brave). 

The article also discusses related classroom activities that teach students how phishing words, how to check credible sources, and spotting deceptive URLs.  The goal of the course is to “encourage kids to make checking all news and information a habit- not just those they think seem suspicious.”

Evaluation:

This short article provides helpful links that show that can be used for reference when gathering lesson ideas for “fake news” and working on media literacy.

Fake News Alerts: Teaching News Literacy Skills in a Meme World

Taylor, Diana

ID – Media Literacy

Ireland, S. (2018). Fake news alerts: Teaching news literacy skills in a meme world. The Reference Librarian, 59(3), 122-128.

Summary: In this article, Ireland addresses the need for students to have the skills to be able to decipher whether information is true or not. In today’s fast paced world of technology, most information is sent in less than 100 words, and readers view it as true. Ireland suggests that librarians can make their own memes and infographics to provide visual information to combat it. This article covers memes, what is fake news, identifying fake news, identifying reliable news sources, accessing sources, addressing bias and logical fallacies, and how to stop being part of the problem.

Evaluation: This was an excellent article on how librarians can help address the issue of fake news with students. Ireland provides us with all the necessarily terminology to discuss fake news and provides resources to post in the library for students to view.

Blended Learning: Working with only one iPad

Sullivan, Maureen
ID

Weller, K. (2014) Blended Learning: Working with One iPad.
Retrieved from: http://www.edutopia.org/blog/blended-learning-working-one-ipad

Summary: Kristin Weller describes how she used the Show-me App to allow students to teach each other ways to solve math problems by way of podcasting. Although she only has one iPad, she has developed a way for students to use the app that is then accessible to all students. After pairs finish recording their podcasts, she uploads them to her interactive whiteboard to review skills and new standards. This process of recording their thinking in a podcast reinforces the students’ understanding, and also solidifies their thinking as they teach the problem to a peer.

Evaluation: I find it encouraging to see how a teacher continues to integrate technology into her class in meaningful ways, even if she doesn’t have enough devices to go around simultaneously. Many teachers are quick to point out the deficits in their classrooms regarding technology, rather than thinking though how to get around those barriers.