Using TRAILS to Assess Student Learning

Kolling, Kathleen

Curriculum and Assessment

Citation

Owen, P.L. (2010). Using TRAILS to assess student learning: A step-by-step guide. LMC, 28(6), 36-38.

Summary

TRAILS-9 is a knowledge test made up of multiple choice questions for grades 3,6,9, and 12 that assesses students’ knowledge of five information literacy areas: develop topic; identify potential resources; develop, use and revise search strategies; evaluate sources ad information; and recognize how to use information responsibly. It is great for teachers and librarians to use to capture a large amount of information quickly, to collaborate with classroom teachers, assess student learning, revise our instruction, and show evidence of our library’s impact on student learning. 

Evaluation

Using state test scores and TRAILS-9 scores, librarians can build standards-based lessons to bring to teachers, justifying their collaboration with data analyses. I was pleased to see that formative assessments are out there for librarians to use, specifically related to our instruction, and that they’re free! The four age levels available (Grades 3,6,9, and 12), are perfect check-in points for both teachers and librarians to see well students are receiving/understanding information literacy knowledge- midway through elementary school, the beginning of middle school, and the beginning and end of high school. I will definitely present this to my staff this school year.

Formative assessment practice, formative leadership practice, formative teaching practice, assessment of learning, assessment for learning, assessment as learning

Lopez, Carrie

CA

Dixon, M. (2009). Formative assessment practice, formative leadership practice, formative teaching practice, assessment of learning, assessment for learning, assessment as learning. New Zealand Principals’ Federation Magazine, 15-17.

Article on the idea of assessing FOR learning, rather than the traditional ‘of’ learning. Huge difference, for learning would be much for informative for students and teachers. The article also does a good job of emphasizing the importance of effective feedback for both teachers and students, in order for assessments to be as effective as they can be.

Sal Khan: Let’s teach for mastery — not test scores

Lester, Debbie
CA
Khan, S. (2016). Let’s teach for mastery — not test scoresTed.com. Retrieved 19 December 2016, from http://www.ted.com/talks/sal_khan_let_s_teach_for_mastery_not_test_scores?utm_source=tedcomshare&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=tedspread
Sal Khan: Let’s teach for mastery — not test scores
Fill in learning gaps and once you master something move to the next topic or subject. Traditional education models don’t do this. Instead, they teach, do homework, then test. Even though there are gaps, the teacher moves on to the next subject. Many times in math when students have gaps, this causes problems later on in their learning. We wouldn’t  build a house on  a foundation with holes, but we send students on to the next topics even though their foundations aren’t strong.