“Librarying” outside the library

Posted by: Ellis, Ruth, CO

Caladaza, B. (2019). “Librarying” outside the library. Knowledge Quest, 47(4), 36–43. Retrieved from https://search-ebscohost-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=134920242&site=ehost-live&scope=site

In this article, Caladaza (2019) highlights programming successes from her area that come from libraries working with subject teachers outside of the library (p. 38). For example, she discusses classroom activities created with the input of subject teachers with the librarians to enhance the curriculum: scavenger hunts for a research capstone class, Dia de los Muertos events in foreign language classrooms, constitutional amendment activities in government, etc. (Caladaza, 2019, p. 38). She describes several of these events, including author visits and a reading contest. The programs she describes range from co-teaching to collaborating with community members to hosting state competitions.  I thought this article was an interesting discussion of the ways that a teacher librarian can collaborate with other stakeholders in a school’s community. While I might have wanted to read more of the key details in how she and her team accomplish this, I do think this article is a great example of how a librarian can develop the role similar to the ways we’ve been discussing in class.

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Collaborative Learning Tips & Strategies

Kumar, Amy

Collaboration

TeachThought.20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers.June 28, 2018. Retrieved from https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/20-collaborative-learning-tips-and-strategies.

Summary: This article from the team at the TeachThought online journal features a numbered list of twenty learning strategies for collaboration among teachers as well as the research supporting those efforts.

Analysis: While the website itself is rife with ads, set aside those distractions and you will find a great article on collaborative teaching and the science behind why it works. According to the authors, research “suggests that students who worked collaboratively on math computational problems earned significantly higher scores than those who worked alone.” While teacher librarians are often convincing teachers to co-teach alongside them, it is this kind of data that may help our case.

Piloting the Learning Commons

DeLuca, Allison

CO

Murray, E. (2015). Piloting the Learning Commons. Teacher Librarian, 43(1), 18–24. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=110469425&site=ehost-live&scope=site

 

This article discusses using learning commons in the process of co teaching and collaboration between classroom teachers and teacher librarians. The article is told by a classroom teacher who works with the media specialist in her school in order to introduce her students to the learning commons and use it as a productive space for learning. The teacher realized the excitement that the children had when introduced to the learning commons and saw the potential for her students. The article emphasizes the importance of putting aside time for collaboration and the success that comes from collaborating with a media specialist in the school. The author gives details on her personal collaboration process with the librarian in order to give an idea on how to successfully collaborate in order to benefit students.

 

I feel as though this article is helpful for encouraging schools to transform library spaces into learning commons as well as encouraging classroom teachers to work towards collaboration with school librarians or media specialists. Collaboration is a key to success when it comes to the achievement of students. Also, the highlighting of the learning commons space was also a significant part of this article. Learning commons allow for students to be more creative and have more freedom when it comes to inquiry and learning. Current library spaces in schools have the potential to be transformed into learning commons in order to not only encourage student use, but to encourage collaboration between staff.

Monthly menu: Collaboration tool

Gomes, Kathline

Collaboration (CO)

Hincks, K. (2018, May 1). Order up: A monthly menu for collaboration. Retrieved from https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/order-up-a-monthly-menu-for-collaboration/

This is a blog post about how to use a “monthly menu” of activities to proactively suggest ideas for collaboration/coteaching with classroom teachers. It includes sample documents.

I like the idea of coming to classroom teachers with ideas already formed – I think they would be more open to collaborating or coteaching if the librarian has already generated some ideas. The author really takes into consideration teachers’ perspectives, curriculum needs, and time constraints, which I am sure goes a long way towards building those collaborative connections. This seems like a good way to advocate for all of the possibilities a librarian can provide for supporting and improving instruction!

What are we asking kids to do? Designing research projects that ignite creativity

Van Duzee, Alyssa

(CO) Collaboration

Miller, A. (2018, March 09). What are we asking kids to do? Designing research projects that ignite creativity. Retrieved from https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/asking-kids-designing-research-projects-ignite-creativity/

The term “research” is often synonymous with boring, tedious, and dull. But it doesn’t have to be that way. This article challenges people to shift their thinking and make research more relevant to students.  If we want students to challenge themselves and think critically, we need to ask ourselves two major questions when we are planning research projects:

  1. Do our assignments offer choice and autonomy?
  2. Is there a greater purpose and relevancy to our assignments?

Research needs a purpose and students need to understand that purpose. If we can keep these questions in the back of our minds when collaborating with teachers and designing research lessons, students will become more engaged, thus resulting in deeper and more critical thinking and learning.

Collaborative Strategies for Teaching Reading Comprehension : Maximizing Your Impact

Khera, Michelle

Collaboration (CO)

Moreillon, J. (2007). Collaborative strategies for teaching reading comprehension: Maximizing your impact. Chicago: American Library Association.

https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/lib/sjsu/detail.action?docID=3001627# 

This is a link to a book called Collaborative Strategies for Teaching Reading Comprehension: Maximizing Your Impact by Judi Moreillon. It provides excellent information about the different ways teachers and librarians can collaborate in order to help increase students’ reading comprehension. What struck me was the vast amount of evidence showing that the higher rate of collaboration between teachers and librarians, the higher the students’ reading scores. I also liked the different approaches the book gives as far as how to co-teach, such as one teaching, one supporting, or station or center teaching, or parallel teaching. I look forward to spending more time with this book, as this is a topic about which I am very passionate.

 

Collaboration Study

Veronica May

Collaboration

Harada, V. H. (2016). A Practice-Centered Approach to Professional Development: Teacher- Librarian Collaboration in Capstone Projects. School Library Research (19), 1-47. http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eft&AN=119793547&site=ehost-live&scope=site

This article is packed with amazing information and I wanted to pass it on. The report discuss three years of research on a school in Hawaii in which Professional Development supported the work of teachers and teacher-librarians. The research highlights the difficulties of TL and CT collaboration but also ways it significantly makes a differences. The collaboration study last for more than one school year, which gave researchers an advantage in having a lot of data to work with. The CT and TL worked with students on an inquiry-based capstone project. They were continually mentored through the rigorous process of teaching the students how to complete the project. The researchers were able to study multiple areas of IL instruction as they observed the students, the CT and TL, and the PD mentors.

Educational theory, interventions, and professional development techniques are discussed throughout.