“Librarying” outside the library

Posted by: Ellis, Ruth, CO

Caladaza, B. (2019). “Librarying” outside the library. Knowledge Quest, 47(4), 36–43. Retrieved from https://search-ebscohost-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=134920242&site=ehost-live&scope=site

In this article, Caladaza (2019) highlights programming successes from her area that come from libraries working with subject teachers outside of the library (p. 38). For example, she discusses classroom activities created with the input of subject teachers with the librarians to enhance the curriculum: scavenger hunts for a research capstone class, Dia de los Muertos events in foreign language classrooms, constitutional amendment activities in government, etc. (Caladaza, 2019, p. 38). She describes several of these events, including author visits and a reading contest. The programs she describes range from co-teaching to collaborating with community members to hosting state competitions.  I thought this article was an interesting discussion of the ways that a teacher librarian can collaborate with other stakeholders in a school’s community. While I might have wanted to read more of the key details in how she and her team accomplish this, I do think this article is a great example of how a librarian can develop the role similar to the ways we’ve been discussing in class.

A Prime Co-Teaching Opportunity

Taylor, Diana

CO

Jones, T. N. (2016, March 5). A Prime Co-Teaching Opportunity. Retrieved from https://www.slj.com/?detailStory=a-prime-co-teaching-opportunity

Summary: In this article, Jones discusses what it means for librarians to collaborate alongside of teachers and provides various co-teaching structures that can work. When just starting out, she recommends strategies for how to find likely partners of collaboration, how to find what research projects are planned, what to do next, and how to incorporate technology. She provides an overview the seven models of co-teaching. She also provides an overview of her “team teaching” model experience working with another teacher.

Evaluation: This article is particularly useful to new individuals going into the teacher librarian profession. It gave very specific strategies on how to support classroom instruction, so it was very real world applicable in terms of take away points.

Collaborative Learning Tips & Strategies

Kumar, Amy

Collaboration

TeachThought.20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers.June 28, 2018. Retrieved from https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/20-collaborative-learning-tips-and-strategies.

Summary: This article from the team at the TeachThought online journal features a numbered list of twenty learning strategies for collaboration among teachers as well as the research supporting those efforts.

Analysis: While the website itself is rife with ads, set aside those distractions and you will find a great article on collaborative teaching and the science behind why it works. According to the authors, research “suggests that students who worked collaboratively on math computational problems earned significantly higher scores than those who worked alone.” While teacher librarians are often convincing teachers to co-teach alongside them, it is this kind of data that may help our case.

Building Teamwork and Early Perseverance in Early Elementary Students with Breakout

Harris, Janet

Schwartz, K., Retrieved 1-24-19  from: https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/52723/building-                 teamwork-and-perseverance-in-early-elementary-students-with-breakouts

CO

Summary

A  breakout was designed for a teacher who wanted her students to work together as a team. The breakout worked well to assist with this task by encouraging students to work collaboratively in a group to resolve a problem using communication skills.

According to the article, “the goal of a Breakout is for groups of students to work together to solve a series of puzzles. Each correct puzzle yields a part of the final code, which opens a locked box. If groups can complete all the puzzles and get the correct code in one hour, they successfully “breakout.” Sessions for younger students were done by rotating modules to work puzzles to earn a clue to figure out a problem.

Building upon the skills the students have can assist with confidence building. They assist to make students self-directed learners. This allows teachers to use the reset model. Review, evaluate resources seek a peer, enact the plan, try again.

 

 

 

Implementing & Evaluating Instructional Partnerships

Kim Stuart

Berg, K., Kramer, J., & Werle, M. (2019). Implementing & Evaluating Instructional Partnerships. Knowledge Quest, 47(3), 32–38. Retrieved from https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/

Collaboration

“Can you find these books for me?” evolved into, “I have this idea. What can we do to explore—and possibly—explode it?”

In response to the revision of North Dakota’s school library standards, the new AASL standards, and the popularity of project-based learning, Bismarck Public Schools developed training for school librarians with partner classroom teachers on collaboration. The foundation for the workshop came from Judi Moreillon’s research on coteaching, which lead to the creation of a rubric that measured the level of collaboration in which teachers and school librarians engage.

A teacher-librarian and teacher duo then shared their experiences in collaboration after the workshop, and reported that it was greatly enhanced. They shared examples of their activities, including the creation of maker-type spaces that supported project-based learning and Genius Hours.

I highly recommend this article for the rubric alone, which is a fantastic tool to measure where teacher-librarians might be in their collaborative journey.

 

 

Can Minecraft Teach Team Building?

Dilworth, Marianne

CO

Kiang, D. (2018, February 13). Can Minecraft teach team building? Retrieved from https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=156&category=In-the-classroom&article=Can+Minecraft+teach+team+building%3f 

 

  1. Don’t damage other people’s things.
  2. If you break something by accident, fix it.
  3. Keep the world beautiful.

The above rules were developed by a group of high school computer science students when their teacher assigned them a game of Minecraft. Their teacher, Douglas Kiang, describes the reasons behind this unusual curriculum decision in his article “Can Minecraft Teach Team Building?”

When Kiang realized that his students still didn’t know each other two months into school, he knew he had to find a team building activity. Minecraft, a hugely popular video game, involves creatively solving problems while gathering resources, experiencing combat, and building structures in a 3D world. Kiang found that students working collaboratively in a virtual world, developed real-world lessons in relationship building; they developed the ability to negotiate and compromise.

Kiang interesting article shares how Minecraft can be a valuable learning tool for students. Video games are often frowned upon as a waste of time that simply builds hand-eye coordination. But video games like Minecraft and other player versus player (PVP) games, are really online stories that encourage peer interaction, personal responsibility and community building.  Even though the students did not play the game during school hours, Kiang found that their Minecraft participation acted as a “catalyst” for dynamic discussions that enriched classroom learning. 

Piloting the Learning Commons

DeLuca, Allison

CO

Murray, E. (2015). Piloting the Learning Commons. Teacher Librarian, 43(1), 18–24. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=110469425&site=ehost-live&scope=site

 

This article discusses using learning commons in the process of co teaching and collaboration between classroom teachers and teacher librarians. The article is told by a classroom teacher who works with the media specialist in her school in order to introduce her students to the learning commons and use it as a productive space for learning. The teacher realized the excitement that the children had when introduced to the learning commons and saw the potential for her students. The article emphasizes the importance of putting aside time for collaboration and the success that comes from collaborating with a media specialist in the school. The author gives details on her personal collaboration process with the librarian in order to give an idea on how to successfully collaborate in order to benefit students.

 

I feel as though this article is helpful for encouraging schools to transform library spaces into learning commons as well as encouraging classroom teachers to work towards collaboration with school librarians or media specialists. Collaboration is a key to success when it comes to the achievement of students. Also, the highlighting of the learning commons space was also a significant part of this article. Learning commons allow for students to be more creative and have more freedom when it comes to inquiry and learning. Current library spaces in schools have the potential to be transformed into learning commons in order to not only encourage student use, but to encourage collaboration between staff.