Implementing & Evaluating Instructional Partnerships

Kim Stuart

Berg, K., Kramer, J., & Werle, M. (2019). Implementing & Evaluating Instructional Partnerships. Knowledge Quest, 47(3), 32–38. Retrieved from https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/

Collaboration

“Can you find these books for me?” evolved into, “I have this idea. What can we do to explore—and possibly—explode it?”

In response to the revision of North Dakota’s school library standards, the new AASL standards, and the popularity of project-based learning, Bismarck Public Schools developed training for school librarians with partner classroom teachers on collaboration. The foundation for the workshop came from Judi Moreillon’s research on coteaching, which lead to the creation of a rubric that measured the level of collaboration in which teachers and school librarians engage.

A teacher-librarian and teacher duo then shared their experiences in collaboration after the workshop, and reported that it was greatly enhanced. They shared examples of their activities, including the creation of maker-type spaces that supported project-based learning and Genius Hours.

I highly recommend this article for the rubric alone, which is a fantastic tool to measure where teacher-librarians might be in their collaborative journey.

 

 

Can Minecraft Teach Team Building?

Dilworth, Marianne

CO

Kiang, D. (2018, February 13). Can Minecraft teach team building? Retrieved from https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=156&category=In-the-classroom&article=Can+Minecraft+teach+team+building%3f 

 

  1. Don’t damage other people’s things.
  2. If you break something by accident, fix it.
  3. Keep the world beautiful.

The above rules were developed by a group of high school computer science students when their teacher assigned them a game of Minecraft. Their teacher, Douglas Kiang, describes the reasons behind this unusual curriculum decision in his article “Can Minecraft Teach Team Building?”

When Kiang realized that his students still didn’t know each other two months into school, he knew he had to find a team building activity. Minecraft, a hugely popular video game, involves creatively solving problems while gathering resources, experiencing combat, and building structures in a 3D world. Kiang found that students working collaboratively in a virtual world, developed real-world lessons in relationship building; they developed the ability to negotiate and compromise.

Kiang interesting article shares how Minecraft can be a valuable learning tool for students. Video games are often frowned upon as a waste of time that simply builds hand-eye coordination. But video games like Minecraft and other player versus player (PVP) games, are really online stories that encourage peer interaction, personal responsibility and community building.  Even though the students did not play the game during school hours, Kiang found that their Minecraft participation acted as a “catalyst” for dynamic discussions that enriched classroom learning. 

Monthly menu: Collaboration tool

Gomes, Kathline

Collaboration (CO)

Hincks, K. (2018, May 1). Order up: A monthly menu for collaboration. Retrieved from https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/order-up-a-monthly-menu-for-collaboration/

This is a blog post about how to use a “monthly menu” of activities to proactively suggest ideas for collaboration/coteaching with classroom teachers. It includes sample documents.

I like the idea of coming to classroom teachers with ideas already formed – I think they would be more open to collaborating or coteaching if the librarian has already generated some ideas. The author really takes into consideration teachers’ perspectives, curriculum needs, and time constraints, which I am sure goes a long way towards building those collaborative connections. This seems like a good way to advocate for all of the possibilities a librarian can provide for supporting and improving instruction!

Collaborative Strategies for Teaching Reading Comprehension : Maximizing Your Impact

Khera, Michelle

Collaboration (CO)

Moreillon, J. (2007). Collaborative strategies for teaching reading comprehension: Maximizing your impact. Chicago: American Library Association.

https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/lib/sjsu/detail.action?docID=3001627# 

This is a link to a book called Collaborative Strategies for Teaching Reading Comprehension: Maximizing Your Impact by Judi Moreillon. It provides excellent information about the different ways teachers and librarians can collaborate in order to help increase students’ reading comprehension. What struck me was the vast amount of evidence showing that the higher rate of collaboration between teachers and librarians, the higher the students’ reading scores. I also liked the different approaches the book gives as far as how to co-teach, such as one teaching, one supporting, or station or center teaching, or parallel teaching. I look forward to spending more time with this book, as this is a topic about which I am very passionate.

 

Loertscher, D.V. (2014). Collaboration and Coteaching. Teacher Librarian, 42(2),

         8-19.
Summary-This article discusses the importance of a teacher librarian in the classroom and how they can be an integral part to the instruction of students.  The role of the librarian has been changed a great deal.  We have gone from just checking books in and out to being involved directly in instruction. This can be done by collaborating with teachers in classroom instruction, PLCs, and professional development. 

Review- I really liked this article because it is true.  I have been working as a teacher librarian for over 5 years now and I do all of these things.  I work collaboratively with the teachers and staff here at the library.  I also am directly involved in coteaching the classes with the classroom teachers.  This article is timely and relevant.

Collaboration and Coteaching

Posted by Karen Kotchka

CO

Loertscher, D. (2014). Collaboration and Coteaching. Teacher Librarian, 42 (2), 8-19.
Summary
In this article the author reviews some of the reasons why the library and librarians have been pushed aside as not being central to a school’s needs and then relates the results of a research study designed to see how much added value to student success would be yielded by a true collaboration and coteaching between a classroom teacher and a teacher librarian.  Results of the study showed a much greater impact on student success for the cotaught lessons.  The author includes some tips and ideas for a teacher librarian to get started on the practice of coteaching with other classroom teachers
Evaluation
I thought the article was valuable to stimulate thinking and action towards making the library a more central part of the school academic culture and it also clarified some of the meanings and interpretations of what types of teachig are now going on in the library and how technology and virtual learning can extend the reach and impact of the library.

Library 2.0 (L2)

Young, Alice

CO – Integrating TL into curriculum
CO – Collaboration Strategies
CO – Collaboration Tools

Library 2.0 (L2) is a transformation in the way library services are delivered to library users. It provides new tools to make the library space (both virtual and physical) more interactive, collaborative and driven by community needs.

The following images from Steve Hargadon site.