Educators, Parents Debate the Common Core

Sue, Jason

CA

APA Citation

CBS Sunday Morning. (2014, September 14). Educators, parents debate the Common Core. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xpptv5bSIi0

Summary

Despite being a federal initiative, Common Core was started as nationwide collaboration from the state level to develop nationwide standards. 45 states and D.C. initially adopted Common Core and were offered grant money in return for participation. One of the benefits of Common Core was that it raised the standards of states like Tennessee and allowed more accurate comparisons of the academic achievements rates of various states. Despite these benefits, implementation of the Common Core has not been without pushback.

Many conservatives felt that the federal government should not be dictating curriculum even if it was the states who had the power to accept or reject Common Core. Opposition to Common Core was also strong in Progressives states. One of the criticisms of progressives was that the standards that Common Core set were unrealistic; and to support their argument, they singled out have specific test questions as being too difficult for certain grade levels. Education can be condensed into a series of increased standards. While Common Core may be flawed, it was a step in the right direction.

Evaluation

This is an outstanding synopsis of the controversy surrounding Common Core.

 

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The Difference Between the Every Student Succeeds Act and No Child Left Behind

Sue, Jason

CA

APA Citation

The Understood Team. (n.d.). The difference between the Every Student Succeeds Act and No Child Left Behind. Retrieved from https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/your-childs-rights/basics-about-childs-rights/the-difference-between-the-every-student-succeeds-act-and-no-child-left-behind

Summary

This resource gives a side by side comparison of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and No Child Left Behind (NCLB). In both acts, the onus is on the States to hold students accountable. One of primary differences between the two acts is that the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is more flexible about the of setting academic goals than its predecessor the No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Also, NCLB did not limit the proportion of students who could take an alternative test whereas ESSA limited the proportion to 1% of test takers. As a measure of accountability, the ESSA allows a wide range of factors such as reading and math test scores, high school graduation rates, as well as other optional factors such as kindergarten readiness. In contrast, the NCLB’s measures of accountability focused on academic achievement relying primarily on reading and math test scores.

Evaluation

The Difference Between the Every Student Succeeds Act and No Child Left Behind is a great overview on the differences between Every Student Succeeds Act and its predecessor (No Child Left Behind). It doesn’t cover the minutia but is perfect for someone who only needs a summary of these two pieces of legislation.

 

 

Social Studies Concepts: An Analysis of the NAEP and States’ Standards

Social Studies Concepts: An Analysis of the NAEP and States’ Standards
Binh Tran
Lord, Kathleen M., Andrea M. Noel, and Bridgette Slevin. “Social Studies Concepts: An Analysis of the NAEP and States’ Standards.” Journal of Research in Childhood Education 30.3 (2016): 389-405. Web.
Summary
In response to the apparent achievement gap in 4th grade Social Studies results on the National Assessment of Educational Progress tests, Lord, Noel and Slevin conducted the following study. The researchers examined the state standards of nine different states and compared them to the contents of the NAEP to determine whether or not what students were being taught were actually being addressed in the NAEP. Focus was placed upon three “global concepts” (conflict, movement, discovery) to see how standards in these states were shaped. Findings revealed that the concepts were each covered inconsistently across each of the nine states examined. Much of the time, concepts were covered in standards largely along lines of direct effect on the state’s history, if it was covered at all. Many of the mission critical concepts assessed on the NAEP are covered during the 4th grade; the exact year they are first introduced to students. Lord, Noel, and Slevin recommend that contents and concepts be split up and introduced as early as 3rd grade in order to better improve student performance and close achievement gaps.
Evaluation
This paper features a very impressive and extensive review of data collected regarding its topic. Writing style tends to be fairly easy to follow and isn’t too bogged down by excessive jargon common to most academic papers. The greater theme that this paper touches on is something that most people struggle with understanding: education does not simply emerge from a vacuum. It is a path that must be carefully charted with a clear understanding the topography of the area covered, as well as the larger goals and concepts that must be used to hold everything together. Assessments are not simply something that should be used to end a lesson, but rather a encapsulation of the process of learning itself.

What to Expect From Librarians in the 21st Century

 
Fleming, Giovanna
SandlianSmith, P. (2013, December 16). What to expect from libraries in the 21st Century. Retrieved
          May 4, 2014, from Youtube website: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fa6ERdxyYdo
CO- Collaboration
ET- Common Core
IL- 21st Century Library
CA- New methods

Summary:
          This video featuring Pam Sandlian Smith is amazing.  She explains with emotion and grace the importance of having libraries as community hubs, learning places, “idea stores”. (Sandlian Smith, P.,2013) Librarians treat everyone with respect and allow them to have a special place to dream and be inspired.
 
Yes, watch this if you get a chance before you do anything else today!  Libraries have been “common core” for years. Many of us know already the other “c’s” librarians bring to the table: community, connections, and cornerstone.
These are the type of libraries, everyone should want to have in our communities.  Our librarians are worth their weight in gold.  It would be “absolutely” wonderful to have more weekly hours in the library on a regular basis.  Let’s not keep it a dream, it should be a reality for every student.  I keep hearing teachers saying, “Librarians are a gift.”  I believe librarians are a necessity. How wonderful would it be to have a lounging area, a creative area, a research area?
Libraries have been common core for years, the four “c’s” come easily, but, we also believe in another few “c’s”. They are “community, connections, and cornerstones”.  We inspire, collaboratively, and build communities. Our libraries should be research centers, safe learning school community hubs with color printers connected to the library computers, lounge areas, as well as creative areas. Pam refers to the London Libraries in the video.  London is now calling their libraries, “idea stores”.  Let’s go shop for ideas. (SandlianSmith, P.,2013) How incredible is that?

I believe our librarians are worth their weight in gold.  Staff members around my sites are constantly saying, “librarians are a gift.” Of course, absolutely!!!  I believe and say to them, “librarians are a necessity.”  At times, it is exhausting but, we do take time to reflect. We evolve, we become better and we inspire others to do the same.  
“why do we need libraries”….”who else is going to do this?”  (SandlianSmith, P.,2013)I realize the focus of the video is of public librarians but, school librarians are created from the same cloth.

Evaluation:  
 
          This video brought me to tears and later, gave me goosebumps.  It’s emotional and inspirational. Would I recommend this video to others? ABSOLUTELY, “who else is going to do it?”.(SandlianSmith, P.,2013)

Inquiry’s path to deep learning

Greene, Shannon
ET
Stripling, B. (2008) Inquiry-based teaching and learning—The role of the Library Media Specialist. School Library Media Activities Monthly XXV (1). Retrieved from http://www.teachingbooks.net/content/InquiringMindsWantToKnow-Stripling.pdf

Summary: This article emphasizes the importance of inquiry in a constructivist view of learning. The author defines the difference between inquiry and information literacy and illustrates the additional domains required to bring inquiry into the realm of information literacy: attitudes, responsibilities and reflection. Descriptions of the importance of inquiry are followed by an exploration of the necessary skills and how inquiry “differs across content areas” including science and math; history and social science; and language arts and literature. Finally, the role of the library media specialist in support of inquiry based learning is outlined and specific strategies are enumerated for collaboration, teaching, collection development and leadership/professional development.


Evaluation: The emphasis on reflection as part of the inquiry model is especially appropriate for our discussions of integrating the “Big Think”ubiquitously into lesson planning. I also appreciated the author’s detailed description of inquiry in different content areas. Her inferences are well reasoned and provide a convenient summary of the distinctive methodologies employed in the different fields of learning