For Radical Educators and Librarians

Name: Roa, Molly.

Topic: E.T.

Citation: Keer, G. (2016). “Barriers to critical pedagogy in information literacy teaching.” In N. Pagowsky & K. McElroy (Eds.), Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook  (pp. 65–74). Chicago: Association of College & Research Libraries.  Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Gr_Keer/publication/319945161_Barriers_to_Critical_Pedagogy_in_Information_Literacy_Teaching/links/59ee28c6a6fdcc32187daeff/Barriers-to-Critical-Pedagogy-in-Information-Literacy-Teaching.pdf

Summary: This entire book was featured previously on this blog, but I wanted to highlight this chapter in particular. Keer reflects all the ways in which librarians must confront our limits as critical pedagogues and how we can work to rethink our roles in the air or neutrality demanded by librarians. While Keer doesn’t come to any firm conclusions, his work challenges the reader to assess critical pedagogy as a theory in contrast with our roles in the library, ways in which we can work effectively and our limitations. This chapter is essential for radical anti-neoliberal educators and librarians to better assess our roles in the classroom, library, and library profession.

Opinion: As a queer woman, I found this work very helpful. I have been interested in critical pedagogy since undergrad, and have struggled to find a way to combine my library profession with my ethics of anti-authoritarianism and liberation for marginalized communities. In fact, this ethical issue can at time be a persistent issue for me in my day-to-day at work in a public library. Keer acknowledges this difficulty and also the overall lack of research and resources that are librarian specific on critical pedagogy.

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On Being in Libraries

Lepine, Sierra

ID

Miller, K. (2018). “On Being in Libraries.” Educause Review. Retrieved from https://er.educause.edu/articles/2018/8/on-being-in-libraries

Fascinating article talking about conducting renovation and rebuilding of physical library space with student inquiry in mind. Written by academic librarian at the University of Miami, discussing a recent project involving University library/librarians, University faculty, students, and educational community members in a conversation about modern student needs and desires regarding both physical library space and intellectual/research processes. Ultimately came up with plans for a Learning Commons area in the library, newly built and designed to cater specifically to 21st century students needs in regards to individualized learning, creative inquiry, learning by doing, community-based knowledge building, etc.

 

Not only did I appreciate the discussion about how design thinking and inquiry can be used in terms of lesson planning and teaching, but also in terms of how to actually design a physical space! I also liked that article ended with an acknowledgement that now students request more quiet space in library, and a rueful acceptance that, while community learning is in vogue, it is still library’s responsibility to provide quiet and contemplative learning spaces for students, too!

Enduring understandings–where are they in the library’s curriculum?

Sutherland, Shannon

CA

Donham, J. (2010) Enduring understandings–where are they in the library’s curriculum?(FEATURE ARTICLE). Teacher Librarian, 38(1), 15-19.

Enduring understandings–where are they in the library’s curriculum? As I was pondering collection management in my high school library, I wondered where standards fit into the equation. Librarian teachers not only have to encourage students to read and acquire knowledge they need to justify their collections based on educational standards or educational goals. Measuring student outcomes based on educational goals. Based on Ralph Tyler’s (1949) educational theories, the author identifies three main sources of these learning goals: the student, society and those creating the standards. Common Core standards are based on society’s needs to “maintain America’s competitive edge.”

Community Collaboration for Inquiry Success

Moreno, Mary

ID, CO

Fuller, C. F, Byerly, G. G., Kearley, D. D., & Ramin, L. L. (2014). Community collaboration for inquiry success. Knowledge Quest, 43(2), 56-59.

http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lls&AN=99171236&site=ehost-live&scope=site  

Summary:

As we have discussed during class, it is often the case that one plus one equals three, at least when it comes to collaboration. In this article, the authors describe what was a one community, one book program turning into renewed focus on student performance and developing a stronger workforce with broad information skills. Inquiry skills would be taught K-12, but the partnership also included college and university librarians who would build on and continue the curriculum. What resulted was the Denton Inquiry 4 Lifelong Learning organization. The DI4LL chose Guided Inquiry Design as their model. A new curriculum for K-20 was developed, and teacher librarians learned new methods of providing instruction “throughout the inquiry process rather than just instruction on accessing information and resources.”

Evaluation:

What stood out to me in this article is the range of the collaboration. I’ve never heard of K-20 planning before, and I think it is an amazing idea. The authors were honest about some of the growing pains associated with this process: staff found finding time challenging, and shifting perspectives wasn’t always smooth. The group had a can-do attitude, however. Grants were written for additional staff and PD opportunities. The new relationships built through this process promoted success, and the group developed an integrated ID curriculum that librarians are excited about.

Librarians in the huddle: Supporting athlete success on and off the field

Persinger, Danielle

CO

Erdmann, J., Clark, P. H., (2016). Libraries in the huddle: Supporting athlete success on and off the field. College and Research Libraries News, 77(3), 144-146, 157. Retreived from: http://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/9464/10715

Erdmann and Clark describe their experience of creating a co-learning opportunity with the College Field Hockey team. The librarians offered a quite study space and academic research help in a seldom used, 2nd floor area, of the library. The Field Hockey team continued to use the space outside of class hours and became comfortable in the library.

This article was an unexpected find. I work in an academic library and was not aware that some libraries partner with athletic departments to discuss information literacy as well create good study habits. I would love to find out if this is replicated in other libraries and what the students and libraries find most rewarding. With only 27 students, this is simply an anecdotal account.

Allen, M. (2008). Promoting Critical Thinking Skills in Online Information Literacy Instruction Using a Constructivist Approach. College & Undergraduate Libraries, 15(1/2), 21-38. doi:10.1080/10691310802176780. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=34179935&site=ehost-live&scope=site
This article discusses how the constructivist approach is becoming an increasingly popular way of teaching literacy skills in the library.  In this approach, the teacher works as the facilitator or the guide to learning. This is a trend that increasing in the library. Librarians are learning ways in which they can achieve these goals within their libraries. They are learning ways to make learning in ways that are more online and asynchronous instead of the typical one-shot lecture method.  This way is being embraced more and more and seems to be something that we need to embrace. 

Lamb, A. (2016). Crowdsourcing and the School Library. Teacher Librarian, 44(2), 56-60.  Retrieved from:
This article discusses the usage of Crowdsourcing in the Library and how this method can be used to teach information literacy skills to students.  Student can participate in activities that can use crowdsourcing in which they can real world information to organize information.  This can be done with interesting activities where students can group information and data in a fun and interesting way.