Design Thinking for Libraries: A Toolkit for Patron-Centered Design

DeFrancesco, Joe

ID

Ideo. (2015). Design Thinking for Libraries: A Toolkit for Patron-Centered Design. Retrieved https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B6FE-lUcg9AuVVh3a3NCRnVPNFk

This 17 page toolkit will be a valuable resource for any library and its’ staff that wants to deliver patron-centered design service offerings. This guide will give you a quick primer on design thinking for libraries. Using this design thinking platform in combination with an inquiry approach to service offerings at you library will enhance your reputation as a true resource.

Early literacy programs in public libraries: best practice

DeFrancesco, Joe

ET

Campbell-Hicks, R. (2016). Early literacy programs in public libraries: best practice. The Australian Library Journal. Retrieved https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00049670.2016.1121770

This article hwill help you create early literacy programs in the public library by learning best practices of other public libraries that played a role by reaching out into the community, providing a variety of programs, working intergenerationally and developing a culture of reading.

 

Public Libraries: A Vital Space for Family Engagement

DeFrancesco, Joe

CA

Lopez, E. Caspe, M. MCWILLIAMS, L. (2016). PUBLIC LIBRARIES: A Vital Space for Family Engagement. Harvard Family Research Project. Public Library Association. Retrieved http://www.ala.org/pla/sites/ala.org.pla/files/content/initiatives/familyengagement/Public-Libraries-A-Vital-Space-for-Family-Engagement_HFRP-PLA_August-2-2016.pdf

This Harvard Family Research Project will highlight how the Public Library is a vital space for family engagement.  Family engagement is a shared responsibility and this 26 page detailed report will enhance your skill sets associated with becoming a public librarian that is viewed as a great resource to the community it serves.

Limitless Libraries: The Benefits of Connecting School + Public Libraries

DeFrancesco, Joe

CO

Barney, A. (2018). Limitless Libraries: The Benefits of Connecting School + Public Libraries. Follett Community News Webinar. Retrieved from https://event.on24.com/eventRegistration/console/EventConsoleApollo.jsp?&eventid=1624283&sessionid=1&username=&partnerref=&format=fhaudio&mobile=false&flashsupportedmobiledevice=false&helpcenter=false&key=07B6EE0CA58D4988437B7551ADE7F635&text_language_id=en&playerwidth=1000&playerheight=650&overwritelobby=y&eventuserid=205654513&contenttype=A&mediametricsessionid=168002601&mediametricid=2323804&usercd=205654513&mode=launch

This one-hour video is jammed pack with ideas how School and Public libraries can collaborate with a school system.  Limitless Libraries removes the fear associated with developing a relationship while enhancing trust between Public Libraries and School Systems.  There are to many best practice behaviors to list.  If you are interested in developing a common goal or goals between a school system and their librarians with the public library and their staff then this video is for you from limitless libraries.

The Six Must-Have Elements Of High Quality Project-Based Learning

McLaughlin, Gretchen

ET

Schwartz, K. (2018, February 23). The Six Must-Have Elements Of High Quality Project-Based Learning | MindShift | KQED News. Retrieved March 06, 2018, from

https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2018/02/22/the-six-must-have-elements-of-high-quality-

project-based-learning/

Katrina Schwartz acknowledges that teachers’ interests in Project-based Learning (PBL) has “exploded” in recent years.  However, Bob Lenze from the Buck Institute for Education argues that educators often misunderstand PBL, particularly what makes a project meaningful. In response, the Buck Institute collected a team of teachers, education leaders, policy groups, Buck representatives, and international stakeholders to design “A Framework for High Quality Project Based Learning” to be released March 2018.  To structure a PBL for students, the endeavor must include intellectual challenge and accomplishment; authenticity; a public product; collaboration; project management; and reflection.  It is important to note that the framework describes what student learning looks like rather than a focus on what teachers are doing. Also noteworthy is the Buck Institute stresses that a PBL be connected to the Standards and be intellectually challenging.  I believe these PBLs are most meaningful for teaching and learning with respect to the culture of testing in public schools. A teacher can “kill two birds with one stone” if she designs and supports learning with fidelity to the Framework.

 

ESSA: An opportunity for school library funding.

McLaughlin, Gretchen

CA

Johns, S., & Kachel, D. (2017).  ESSA: An opportunity for school library funding.  Teacher Librarian, (44)4, 8.  

 

Authors Johns and Kachel stress the importance of school librarians and their advocates working locally in the assurance that library programs/resources receive federal funding from the Every Child Succeeds Act (ESSA) 2015.  Because libraries are now legally acknowledged as “specialized instructional support personnel,” it is imperative that students have equitable access to school libraries. In response, the American Association of School Librarians has published a position statement of what constitutes an effective library program, with an emphasis on the role of the library as an instructional program.  This program includes the teaching of every student and collaborating with every teacher, as well as curating digital resources in the content areas. Teacher librarians must also secure funding that may help them provide supplemental instruction in digital literacy, content-specific blended learning experiences, and personalized learning endeavors. The teacher-librarian, as a specialized instructional support person, has the power to enrich the learning experiences of all students, thus it is important to organize and secure grants at the district level.  Library programs can be eligible for the following federal grants: Title 1, Literacy Education for All, Results for the Nation (LEARN); Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL); and Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants. To assist in advocacy, the AASL provides several resources including talking points and elevator speeches. I agree with the authors who stress the importance of understanding the language of ESSA in order to organize a local strategic funding committee. Most importantly, teacher-librarians must be vocal advocates about the library being at the center of teaching and learning in schools in order to secure a portion of the ESSA funding.

 

Theories of Learning and Computer-Mediated Instructional Technologies

Lopez, Carrie

ET

Hung, D. (2001). Theories of Learning and Computer-Mediated Instructional Technologies. Educational Media International, 38(4), 281-287. doi:10.1080/09523980110105114. http://woulibrary.wou.edu.my/weko/eed502/Theories_of_Learning_and_CMI_Technologies.pdf

Explains different educational theories and argues that there is a place for all theories in educational practice. I appreciated this article, as I often feel that new theories are presented as “this NEW theory is the right one!” and I have often felt that there really is a little bit of all of the theories I have studied in my classroom everyday. So, I appreciated this article reinforcing what I experience.

Formative assessment practice, formative leadership practice, formative teaching practice, assessment of learning, assessment for learning, assessment as learning

Lopez, Carrie

CA

Dixon, M. (2009). Formative assessment practice, formative leadership practice, formative teaching practice, assessment of learning, assessment for learning, assessment as learning. New Zealand Principals’ Federation Magazine, 15-17.

Article on the idea of assessing FOR learning, rather than the traditional ‘of’ learning. Huge difference, for learning would be much for informative for students and teachers. The article also does a good job of emphasizing the importance of effective feedback for both teachers and students, in order for assessments to be as effective as they can be.

Potential Effects of Teaching Strategies on Students’ Academic Performance under a Trump Administration

Lopez, Carrie

CA

Guirguis, R. & Pankowski, J. Potential Effects of Teaching Strategies on Students’ Academic Performance under a Trump Administration Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1133888.pdf


Article examines the potential effects of the Trump Administration on teaching in NY state, examines possible effects on ELLs and low socio-economic status students as privatization could possible affect access to programs such as Head Start, etc. Though this article focuses on New York State, the implications certainly extend to other areas, food for thought for anyone teaching in an economically disadvantaged school or area.

Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century

Olsen, Norma


IL-21st-century learning
IL-Media Literacy
IL-participatory culture

Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Robison, A. J., Weigel, M., & Clinton, K. (2007). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture ; media education for the 21st century. Digital Kompetanse, 2(1), 23-33. Retrieved from https://www.macfound.org/media/article_pdfs/JENKINS_WHITE_PAPER.PDF


In this article Henry Jenkins, director of the Comparative Media Studies department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, looks at the development of these skills through the lens of participatory culture. Participatory culture, as defined by Jenkins, is a “
“Culture with relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement, strong support for creating and sharing one’s creations, and some type of informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced is passed along to novices. A participatory culture is also one in which members believe their contributions matter, and feel some degree of social connection with one another…” (3)
Since participatory culture already defines the youth today, he encourages creating a more systemic approach to media literacy that can foster these skills and cultural competencies that can promote not only individual expression, but community involvement. He develops a new frameworks for literacy through the lens of participatory culture.
Jenkins identifies 11 crucial media literacy skills that individuals will need to participate in the new media culture:
  • Play—the capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of problem-solving
  • Performance—the ability to adopt alternative identities for the purpose of improvisation and discovery
  • Simulation—the ability to interpret and construct dynamic models of real-world processes
  • Appropriation—the ability to meaningfully sample and remix media content
  • Multitasking—the ability to scan one’s environment and shift focus as needed to salient details
  • Distributed Cognition—the ability to interact meaningfully with tools that expand mental capacities
  • Collective Intelligence—the ability to pool knowledge and compare notes with others toward a common goal
  • Judgment—the ability to evaluate the reliability and credibility of different information sources
  • Transmedia Navigation—the ability to follow the flow of stories and information across multiple modalities
  • Networking—the ability to search for, synthesize, and disseminate information
  • Negotiation—the ability to travel across diverse communities, discerning and respecting multiple perspectives, and grasping and following alternative norms.
As he explains each of these skills and competencies he offers a suggestion of what might be done to make the teaching and practice a systematic exercise and natural process of education.

The 21st-century presents an ever-changing landscape when it comes to Internet technologies Educators today confront the challenge of preparing youth to not just be knowledgeable, but to be knowledge-able. In this landscape, educators must look into the horizon and foresee the impact that Internet technologies and inform their teaching practices. This article offers a perspective that teacher librarians can use to support teachers and students prepare for what lays ahead. Technology is a tool; we define its potential by envisioning its use and charting that path.