Preparing Teachers and Librarians to Collaborate to Teach 21st Century Skills: Views of LIS and Education Faculty

Samnath, Kayla


CO


Latham, D., Gross, M., & Witte, S. (2013). Preparing Teachers and Librarians to Collaborate to Teach 21st Century Skills: Views of LIS and Education Faculty. School Library Research, 16, 1-23. Retrieved April 20, 2016, from: http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/aaslpubsandjournals/slr/vol16/SLR_PreparingTeachersLibrarianstoCollaborate_V16.pdf


Summary:
This article really explored the relationship between librarians and educational faculty. The research conducted was through specific case studies of teachers working with librarians. Through this research, authors discovered how “successful Collaborative relationships in the field is fraught with challenges” (Latham et al. 2013). One key point the authors point out is that teachers do not understand the potential role librarians can play in assisting student learning outcomes. Some of the learning outcomes teachers find themselves focusing on is “information literacy”.  This revolves around assessing, evaluating, and managing information.
Through a case study approach, the authors were able to provide a few strategies for successful collaboration, as well as identify some of the barriers. Participants suggested a course where both education and LIS students could take in which they work together. Several participants also suggested a course that solely focused on 21st century skills. Utilizing these methods might increase and foster collaboration between educators and librarians. The major barrier the authors identified was the perception of the librarian role. Educators and administrators typically underestimate the usefulness of the position.
With the implementation of common core, teachers are encouraged more than ever to collaborate with the librarian. Even a library seminar is extremely helpful. The authors point out that college freshman with a “below” average score in information literacy find demonstrations of electronic materials and search engines to be the most useful.


Review:
This article was extremely useful in explaining some of the challenge educators and librarians face in terms of collaboration. Although parties acknowledge the usefulness of co-teaching, implementation has been questionable at best. I also enjoy when authors use a case study approach, because it is analyzing current faculty and their experiences. However, the authors themselves admit their sample size is small, and therefore cannot be generalized. They suggest that more information be conducted in this area, and i could not agree more. One important factor this article points out is the perceptions of teachers and administration towards the librarian. I think this has a large impact as to why there is a lack of collaboration between parties. I would recommend this article for any novice who is learning about 21st century skills and collaboration/co-teaching.

CA-Formative and Summative Assessments

Rebecca Robinowitz

CA

Marsha Lovette PhD, director of Carnegie Mellon University and Psychology professor (2009) What is the difference between formative and summative assessment? Retrieved from: http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/assessment/basics/formative-summative.html

Summary

According to Marsha Lovette PhD, director of Carnegie Mellon University and Psychology professor (2009), summative assessment appears to be in contrast with formative assessment. Formative assessment evaluates student development and progress and summative assessment evaluates a learner’s knowledge of an instructional unit by comparing it against some standard or benchmark. Examples of summative assessments include a midterm exam, final project, paper, or standardized tests. Summative assessments provide education stakeholders tangible information about future curriculum needs. However, summative needs can be used in a formative way if it is used to guide educator efforts and activities in subsequent course.

Taking the Doors Off the Classroom Through Collaboration

Duffy, Leah

CO-Collaboration
CO-Collaboration Strategies

Perez, J. (2015, January 7). Taking the doors off the classroom through collaboration. Retrieved May 20, 2016, from http://www.hotchalkeducationnetwork.com/collaboration-with-purpose/ 
Summary and Evaluation:
This article goes over collaboration in schools and how it can be fostered from the beginning of a school. It also goes over the stages that collaboration will often undergo on it’s way to becoming the normal: “forming”, “storming”, “norming”, and “performing”.  If educators can get through these steps it will ultimately improve their teaching.  The article does acknowledge that not all teachers are open to collaboration, especially ones that are establish in working independently.  Though the article cites how consistent collaboration has helped lead to improved math test scores for a school that tried it out. 
This article is easy to understand and is well laid out in sections.  The part that talks about the stages of collaboration were interesting to me because they are the same stages we have talked about in our classes when we do group work.  I also like that Perez defends his position but acknowledges the changes that collaboration faces in schools.  I also appreciate that Perez backs up his statement with a school that has benefited from collaboration.

Duffy, Leah

IL-Information Literacy

Johns, S. K. (2012, March 23). “Library skills” = Information literacy skills = Common Core skills. Retrieved May 20, 2016, from http://blogs.slj.com/make-some-noise/2012/03/23/library-skills-information-literacy-skills-common-core-skills/ 
Summary and Evaluation:
This blog post highlights how the ways that Common Core States Standards incorporates information literacy.  This is specifically highlighted for the benefit of teacher librarians.  The blog post encourages teacher librarians to build on specific information literacy standards to show their worth to school administrators, and policy makers in their states as well as in Washington D.C..  The theme of looking at your school’s standards and curriculum to find the way you may have not noticed that your job as a teacher librarian is central to fulfilling curriculum is a good message.
The blog post is short and sweet and it serves as an important reminder to educators to be their own advocates in their schools and beyond.  They used direct excerpts to illustrate their point and used a voice of empowerment.  It’s also just a valuable lesson beyond the direct subject of the post; be your own advocate!

The Common Core Frequently Asked Questions

Duffy, Leah

CA- Common Core States Standards

The Common Core FAQ. (2014, May 27). Retrieved May 20, 2016, from http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2014/05/27/307755798/the-common-core-faq 
 
Summary/ Evaluation
 
NPR’s educational arm compiles 25 FAQ about the Common Core to try to debunk some of the misconceptions surrounding the standards and clarify what it is for the common person.  The questions cover everything from who developed the Common Core State Standards; to how it effects testing, teaching, math, etc.; to who stands to financially gain from the Common Core.  
 
There is a lot of good information compiled into a single resource for anyone interested in understanding Common Core better.  I liked the general use of easy language that is designed for non teachers.  This is a great starting point for any novices to education that want a foundation understanding of Common Core before they jump further into the standards.

Exploiting Synergies Among Digital Repositories, Special Collections, and Online Community

Reyna, Lisa

IL – Media Literacy

Huwe, T. (2009). Exploiting synergies: among digital repositories, special collections, and online

community. Online, 33(2), 14-19.

Summary/Evaluation

Huwe elaborates on how only just a few years prior to the writing of this particular article, there were only a couple of leading research facilities (E.g. Library of Congress) capable of developing an online presence of high-quality digital library collections. Further discussion into the article depicts that today in current times, this ideal is no longer the case. Huwe speaks of the rise in development of digital collections not only emerging among research libraries, but also other organizations as well as various museums. Research libraries and librarians are evolving with the constant change of advancement in digital media technologies and are becoming familiar with open-source web development tools specialized in digitization, although most collections are of a smaller scale. 
Emphasis is expressed when referencing the importance of historical collections and how an online presence will not only benefit libraries and librarians, but also have the capacity to reach new scholars and experts trying to obtain rare materials within a searchable online environment. Huwe also ventures into the realm of social networking, blogs, and community websites such as MySpace, Facebook, and Bebo, which are currently responsible for enabling managers of digital repositories to merge technologies utilizing web 2.0 applications, therefore symbolizing the effect of creating new synergies. I found this article to be quite interesting as Archivists and scholars now have the ability to be involved in newly developed trends surrounding the accessibility of historically valuable collections through the opportunity to take on leadership roles in scholarly communities.

Good Leaders Learn What Not to Do – Leading from the Library

Reyna, Lisa

ET – Government and Professions

Bell, S. (n.d.). Good Leaders Learn What Not to Do – Leading From the Library. Library Journal. Retrieved May 20, 2016, from http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/09/opinion/leading-from-the-library/good-leaders-learn-what-not-to-do-leading-from-the-library 

Summary/Evaluation

Leadership in the Academic Library Profession: Evaluation and Assessment of Leadership
In the article, “Good Leaders Learn What Not to Do”, Steven Bell mentions how Kouzes and Posner are responsible for the “ten truths of leadership” and how valuable an asset this information is to the working professional, but voices his opinion on the importance of learning what leaders should not do in the workplace as well. [2]
Truth 1: You Make a Difference
Truth 2: Credibility is the Foundation of Leadership
Truth 3: Values Drive Commitment
Truth 4: Focusing on the Future Sets Leaders Apart
Truth 5: You Can’t Do It Alone
Truth 6: Trust Rules
Truth 7: Challenge Is the Crucible of Greatness
Truth 8: You Either Lead by Example or You Don’t Lead at All
Truth 9: The Best Leaders Are the Best Learners
Truth 10: Leadership Is an Affair of the Heart
The ten truths listed above are from Kouzes and Posner’s book, The Truth about Leadership, which each concept is featured in it’s own chapter. [1]
Steven Bell believes that by identifying the presence of ineffective leadership in libraries, this approach could also prove to be just as valuable to the overall success of professional leadership. Throughout this article, he refers to the effectiveness of how not to lead and focuses on another article written by Steve Staninger titled “Identifying the Presence of Ineffective Leadership in Libraries”. Staninger mentions the inability of leaders to treat their employees, as they would want to be treated themselves. Other instances of ineffective leadership include moral disengagement and micromanagement. When these instances arise within the workplace, the negativity can lead to damage of employee morale as well as fundamental damage to the organization itself. [2]
Although leadership can be expressed in many facets, academic librarianship possesses a need to conduct it in a highly professional manner, while working with internal as well as external stakeholders, such as librarians; library staff; administrators; students; faculty; non-library administrators and staff. [2]
I truly believe that all individuals placed within a leader/management role should possess a certain type of skillset and quality, which would allow them to be a positive role model as well as leader in the workplace. Staninger describes that ineffective leaders have a disregard for the importance and value that represents institutional culture by neglecting the consultation of employees who could be beneficial in the overall decision-making process in creating a better workplace. I also believe that there is truth to this theory. As an effective leader, he/she has to maintain a certain quality in order to achieve greatness. True leaders aspire to make a difference and when mistakes are made, they learn from them allowing themselves room for growth and wisdom when bestowing their knowledge onto others. True leaders also allow their employees the credit deserved when making a positive impact on the organization by acknowledgement and recognition.
As Steven Bell describes in his article, I too believe that it is always a better practice of knowing all aspects of management and leadership, even when it comes to researching the ways in which a leader could be ineffective in order to learn and determine which concepts and behaviors to avoid.
Additional Sources:
1. McKinney, M. (n.d.). Leading Blog: A Leadership Blog: Ten Truths about Leadership. Leading Blog: A Leadership Blog: Ten Truths about Leadership. Retrieved May 20, 2016, from http://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/2010/08/ten_truths_about_leadership.html

2. Staninger, S. (2011). Identifying the Presence of Ineffective Leadership in Libraries. Library Leadership & Management, 26(1), 1-7. Retrieved May 20, 2016, from http://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/article/view/5782/5815